I am a linguist, in the process of getting my PhD at the University of Pennsylvania. My research interests are eclectic and interdisciplinary: I am primarily interested in language change and variation, but it's hard to find a topic in linguistics I'm not fascinated by.

My current research interests include Game Theoretic approaches to Pragmatics (specifically, implicature, 'dog whistle,'  euphemism, and microaggression), Evolutionary Game Theoretic approaches to modeling language change and variation, social stratification in language, various topics in African American Vernacular English, and tonal phenomena (primarily in Mandarin).

My advisors are Robin Clark and William Labov.

I came to linguistics late. I spent the last 10 years as a struggling jazz musician (what jazz musician isn't?) and more recently as a research assistant and facilitator for a consulting firm that specializes in high performance through effective management of diverse workforces -- with a significant number of government and military clients.


Current Research

I am always working on a number of projects. Current projects are:

 

Describing the emergence of new pronouns in AAVE;

tracing emerging standards in social media writing and evaluating the extent to which they can tell us something about Phonology (and by extension, dialect geography) in both AAVE and Persian;

modeling 'microaggression' as a Bayesian Signaling Game;

THIS IS NOT MY BOAT. WHO PUT THIS HERE? MOVE YOUR BOAT, BUDDY.

Using Evolutionary Game Theory and Distributed Morphology to model verbal suppletion as competing strategies in a verbal ecology, and testing the model against the historical record for Latin and its daughters;

Modeling the 'euphemism treadmill' as predation in a lexical ecology,

...and a ton of others, including a large, super-secret project on court-reporter comprehension and transcription faithfulness of AAVE, with a team that includes members of the U Penn linguistics department, the Wharton School of Economics, Philadelphia Lawyers for Social Equity, and the NYU Sociology department.